Dtladesigns

Rabí x ASUS

Posted in PRESS by dtladesigns on February 12, 2011
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Posted in PRESS by dtladesigns on December 11, 2008

 

Heres the link to the full interview

www.dailybrink.com

 

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Artist of Paint-Splattered Villaraigosa Mural Speaks Out

By Patrick Range McDonald in Arts News,politics Wed., Oct. 7 2009 @ 8:01AM

Over the past few weeks, we’ve been reporting about the numerous controversies surrounding a mural of Los Angeles Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa at Susy’s Meat Market in East Hollywood, where someone splattered red paint on Villaraigosa’s face and later spray-painted “vendido” on his left collar, which was eventually covered over with white paint.

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Ted Soqui
Villaraigosa mural at Susy’s Meat Market in East Hollywood

 

 

Now, the artist  known as “Rabi,” who created the mural, has contacted us via email with his own update about what’s happening at the site.

Rabi tells us that when he and an artist friend named Retna were painting the mural, they increasingly heard passersby “voice their opinions” about Villaraigosa — and they weren’t all that flattering. After a while, Rabi says, he realized that “maybe it wasn’t such a great idea to endorse this guy.”

But Rabi was commissioned by the owner of Susy’s Meat Market to paint the piece, so he maintained his professionalism, finished the mural, and was quite pleased with the result. About two months later, in September, someone splattered red paint on his creation.

“At first, I was pretty disappointed,” Rabi writes to us in

an email, referring to the red paint, “but then I started to like it even more, it’s become more than another mural — it’s now a statement and an expression of the public, a movement if you will.”

To take it one step further, Rabi went back to the mural yesterday and made an addition with his own red paint. “Like Sand In The Wind,” the artist wrote, with a tag of “The Fear.”

 

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Rabi
Rabi’s addition to the Villaraigosa mural at Susy’s Meat Market

“What this (saying) refers to is the monks that finish their sand paintings and then blow them away,” Rabi tells us. “Also the fact that this Mayor/man is but a speckle in our time soon to be forgotten and a new Mayor/man and mural will emerge, and so on.”

You can see the various stages of Rabi painting the mural and his other work at his Web site: www.dtladesigns.com.

“The Fear,” Rabi also explains, is an “(art) campaign that my friends and I are promoting and will soon be a large part of this city.  ‘The fear’ does not mean to be afraid — it is the total opposite, therefore completely materializing the word and leaving it powerless.”

Villaraigosa often said he hoped to inspire Angelenos, but recent events at Susy’s Meat Market suggest that his time as mayor has gotten people riled up for all of the wrong reasons . . . and now they’re looking to take it to The Man, who, in this case, is Villaraigosa.

It’s something that a young Tony Villar, sporting a “Born to Raise Hell” tattoo, could have never predicted for his own future. In fact, that hell-raising teenager from East L.A., if he was a teenager today, would probably be joining Rabi and his pals in their righteous fun.

Can anyone say “eye-opener”?

 

Contact Patrick Range McDonald at pmcdonald@laweekly.com.

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REMEMBERING MICHAEL JACKSON

Living it on the wall

Graffiti artists in L.A. and elsewhere are paying tribute to the King of Pop and his legacy with both colorful murals and simple messages.

By Yvonne Villarreal
July 08, 2009 in print edition D-7

Michael Jackson stands in his signature pose: hips popped to the right, left arm raised in the air. His gloved right hand sits on his hip and out of his mouth he exclaims, “Hee-hee!” It’s the King of Pop as immortalized in the parking lot of Mid-West Wholesale Lighting on Hollywood Boulevard by L.A.-based artists “Jersey Joe” / “RIME” and “Augor.”

The pair incorporated Jackson’s image into a rough graffiti sketch by New Zealand-based artist “Askew,” and the portrait, although cartoonish in appearance and featuring a medley of Jackson’s trademark looks – styled hair, red leather jacket, sequined glove and tight pants – realistically captures the legacy of the famous (at times, infamous) pop star.

It was all very sudden,” said 30-year-old “Jersey Joe” / “RIME.” “We were working on this sketch as part of The Exchange,” a project through which top-notch graffiti artists swap work, “and a friend of mine called and told me Michael had died. Ten minutes later, we were adding his image to the piece.” The mural is just one of a number of tributes from street artists that are popping up on walls across the United States and afar in the wake of Jackson’s death June 25.

In Tulsa, Okla., an artist named “Big N” painted a likeness of the young Jackson on the side of a building near 11th and Min

go, adding the message “Rest in Peace, King of Pop” next to the image. In Tokyo, a side-view caricature of Jackson pays homage to the late singer.

He can even be found on the side of the Kokua Market building in Moiliili, Hawaii; there, 808 Urban’s design showcases Jackson with an open shirt flowing away from his body, his hat slightly cocked to cover his face as a spotlight shines on him.

For us, as artists, our contribution to his legacy is visual,” said “Prime,” founder of 808 Urban, a group of artists working in low-income neighborhoods. “Michael made a huge impact on the world. People have turned the mural into a vigil. They go there to pay tribute, to see an image, since we don’t have him here. It adds comfort to the community to see him.”

Closer to home, on Melrose Avenue, near Heliotrope Drive, local artist “RABBI” of dtladesigns painted a realistic portrait of Jackson from his “Thriller” days – sporting a red leather jacket, brunet curls cascading over his forehead – with the words “Rest in Peace.”

He made such great music,” said “RABBI,” 24, of Los Angeles. “The Michael Jackson who made you dance, who made you sing along … that Michael Jackson has been gone for a while. I wanted to capture that Mike. Everyone wanted to be that guy.”


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The piece, done with spray paint, took roughly eight hours to complete.

I hope when people see it, they just smile and think about the days when they were just dancing to his music,” “RABBI” said. “People don’t do enough of that.”

Motorists driving down La Brea near San Vicente Boulevard might catch ”Mr. Brainwash’s” contribution. There’s no sequined glove. No portrait of the icon. The black and white mural simply reads, “MICHAEL JACKSONYOU ROCKED OUR WORLD,” with “The King of Pop” splashed across the bottom right corner in red paint.

Jackson, certainly, isn’t the first icon to

be immortalized in such a fashion. Portraits of Marilyn Monroe, the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. and Malcolm X can be found on alleyways and buildings throughout Los Angeles.

Murals are, in some way, the autobiography of a city,” said Jane Golden, executive director of the Philadelphia Mural Arts Program, which has received a few Jackson mural requests. “When someone dies, you often

see memorials happen right away. Art is cathartic that way. What we’re seeing with these murals is an incredible outpouring of appreciation and support for a singer who influenced many peoples’ lives.

People are not only remembering him through the murals, they’re reliving memories they have in relationship to his music.”

yvonne.villarreal@latimes.com

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